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Some quotations about Typography:
“The way something is presented will define the way you react to it. So you can take the same message to be represented in different typfaces, the ’emotional’ response to that would be different. The choice of typeface is the prime ‘weapon’ if you want in that communication."
by Neville Brody

“This is a ‘subliminal’ way of seeing. Maybe the feeling you have, when you see a particular typographic choice used on a piece of packaging is just ‘I like to look at that’, ‘that feels good’, ‘that is my kind of product’…But that is the type casting its ‘scret spell’."
by Rick Poynor

廣告

punctuation-1.png MTV
punctuation-2.png Si Begg
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The punctuation marks can tell you words too
Link

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“Having Guts Always Works Out For Me" by Stefan Sagmeister.

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“I Hope That Works Out For Me As Well" by Me.

Aggo, as I think we should have a little bit character about our blog, so I just made some initial sketches for our blog name…
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Simplify the letters as lazy as possible.
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Feeling lazy, so going sleep! Inspired by the sleeping ZZZ.
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When the eye feels lazy and sleepy, it can’t properly see things clear, like a double Z and a missing half of Y…

Readability and legibility are often confused.

Readability is most often used to describe the ease with which written language is read and understood – it concerns the difficulty of the language itself, not its appearance. Factors that affect readability include sentence and word length, and the frequency of uncommon words. i.e. more about (text content).

Legibility describes how easily or comfortably a typeset text can be read. It is not connected with content or language, but rather with the size and appearance of the printed or displayed text. i.e. more about (text appearance).

A wide range of factors that affecting legibility include type size, type design (eg, comparing serif vs sans serif type, italic type vs roman type), line length, line spacing, colour contrast, the design of right-hand edge (for example, justification (straight right hand edge) vs ranged left, and whether hyphenated).

Some commonly agreed findings of legibility research include:
• text set in lower case is more legible than text set all in upper case (capitals), presumably because lower case letter structures and word shapes are more distinctive, having greater saliency with the presence of extenders (ascenders, descenders and other projecting parts);
• regular upright type (roman) is found to be more legible that italics, contrast, without dazzling brightness, has also been found to be important, with black on yellow/cream being most effective;
• positive images (eg, black on white) are easier to read than negative or reversed (eg, white on black);
• the upper portions of letters play a stonger part than the lower portions in the recognition process;
• legibility is compromised by letterspacing, word spacing and leading that are too tight or too loose. Generous vertical space separates lines of text, making it easier for the eye to distinguish one line from the next, or previous line. Poorly designed fonts and those that are too tightly or loosely fitted can also result in poor legibility.

From Wikipedia

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There is the Kontrapunkt typeface, developed by my internship company, Kontrapunkt in Denmark. It is so good shared for free. I like the typeface because it is special and still legible.
“Developing typefaces is an old craft. Today, we see that typefaces is getting a more and more important role in corporate identities. It is recognized that a typeface is a strong element in the toolbox of a visual identity. We at Kontrapunkt would also like to pace typefaces forward. Having your own font is a subtle and elegant way to illuminate identities", Bo Linnemann says.
Download

I categorized those found typography all around our mobile surroundings such as phones, transportation system, lifts, kiosks and etc as “mobile typography" which is modular-structured, fluid, futuristic and cool.

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A very new approach to Olympic logo. And a typographic/graffiti approach. But I am not very sure it’s the right approach! Whatever I say is not important!!! The most important is the Committe spokesperson Lord Sebastian Coe says: “London 2012 will be everyone’s Games. This is the vision at the very heart of our brand. It will define the venues we build and the Games we hold, and act as a reminder of our promise to use the Olympic spirit to inspire everyone and reach out to young people around the world. It is an invitation to take part and be involved."…that matters… link

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The typeface “Signa Column" is designed by a Danish graphic designer, Ole Søndergaard in 2000. I used it for the SAD Hospital Pharmacies Label and Packaging Design Contest of Denmark. I thought it communicated well as it was modern, bold, simple, readable and scandinavian, that the typeface was working hard!